GreenGeeks®

Great value and support in an eco-friendly web hosting environment.

Dear friends and followers

I’m very excited to tell you about the eco-friendly solution I found to hosting my WordPress.org website / blog.

Before I go further, let me be totally transparent and tell you that there are links and banner ads on this page that may earn me a commission if you purchase web hosting by following those links or banner ads. Just so you know.

Other than that, I’m just a regular, fully paid customer of GreenGeeks, so I can attest to everything I say about them; I haven’t received any incentive to post this testimonial; and I’m writing this because I sincerely believe they have a great service that you should know about. OK? OK!

So, my story. You may have noticed that WordPress.com-hosted sites suddenly went up in price. Way up. And there were no frills with this, believe me! I was forced to pay extra per month just to have a business email, either through WordPress or Google, plus yearly costs if I wanted to use my domain, slowpainful.com. It looked totally random to be at a URL like “slowpainfulcom.wordpress.com.” Talk about embarrassing!

So I was getting really frustrated with this nitpicky set up. Plus the headache of multiple hosts for domains and email, and forget e-commerce. That was going to involve HUGE amounts upfront.

Now, apart from those mundane headaches, there are more existential problems to consider.

You may not be 100% aware that all that infrastructure of servers, housed in football-field-sized data centres, takes a HUGE environmental toll in terms of energy and pollution. A single data centre can cause carbon emissions to 150 thousand pounds in one year!

The number of data centres is growing exponentially. In 2012, there were 500,000 data centres worldwide—today there are an estimated 8 million. Here’s what website IBANPLASTICS has to say about the impact of this mind-boggling number of servers running 24/7/365 (emphasis mine):

Even in 2016, the global power usage by data centres at 416.2 terawatt hours was much more than Britain’s 300 terawatt hours. As a result, data centres emit close to 2% of the global greenhouse gas emissions and use up 3% of the worldwide power usage – those numbers rival what the Aviation industries are responsible for. By 2040, data centres will be responsible for 14% of global carbon emissions.

It gets worse! Those servers heat up and need serious cooling so they don’t fail, losing unimaginable amounts of data (maybe yours!). Here’s IBANPLASTICS again:

To keep the heat generated under control, data centres use coolants. These are necessary for the liquid cooling of the systems and the air-conditioning of the data centres. The trouble is the coolants contain chemicals like Freon and Chlorofluorocarbons that are highly toxic. They also trap heat in the atmosphere, contributing further to global warming.

Kind of terrifying, right? Also discouraging. I didn’t realize the extent of the problem. In fact, like most people, I’d always thought of the Internet in terms of the intangibles, like data on my screen, or email popping up in my inbox. I’d never considered the actual, physical infrastructure, what that actually entailed, or its impact. I certainly hadn’t heard about “eco-friendly” web hosting. But…

Then I found Green Geeks…

I was intrigued by the name, then I read more about GreenGeeks’ commitment to renewable energy.

Their hosting platform has been designed with a maximum-use, no-waste-of-resources mindset and is built to be as energy efficient as possible.

Their model is built around a low or zero carbon footprint: whatever measure of power they pull from the grid, they match three times that in the form of renewable energy via Bonneville Environmental Foundation.

And here’s a piece of tree-hugger trivia: They actually plant a tree for every hosting account that they provision on their hosting platform! I call that adorable.

This means your website will be carbon-reducing when hosted on their platform. Now, wouldn’t it feel good to be taking an active role in mitigating the current climate emergency by hosting with a company that’s so responsible about their environmental impact?

I also was pleased to be able to choose the geographic location of the hosting: so my site resides on Canadian servers (they have data centers in Phoenix, Chicago, Montreal and Amsterdam). I don’t want my data to be subject to the Patriot Act (it’s a post-9/11 thing), which would be the case if my site were on U.S. servers.

When I went to sign up, there was yet another plus, because GreenGeeks was offering Black Friday prices, which meant that I was able to set up hosting for my WordPress site for a year for—are you ready?—$35 CAD. For a year! And of course, that includes having my own email address at no extra cost. It’s simple to configure and keeps everything in one place.

(Now, that was a time-dependent offer, so it may not still apply. At time of writing this, they’re still offering their basic plan at 2.95 per month, paid annually; and their mid-range plan at 4.95 per month, paid annually. In my opinion, it’s a huge deal by any standards, and I don’t have money to throw around. )

Finally, I must say that the support team at GreenGeeks were exceptionally helpful and responsive (24/7 tech help by the way) during set up. They were able to migrate my site from WordPress.com to a standalone WordPress.org site within 24 hours. When you self-host, it’s a little more labor-intensive: you have to back up yourself and also install a security certificate—an absolute must or Google will show your visitors a warning similar to “this website is unsafe”, yikes!—but if you have difficulty, tech support is just a chat or email away.

If you’re not looking specifically for WordPress hosting, but for VPS, shared, or any other configuration, they’ve got you covered.

Check out what GreenGeeks can offer you by clicking the banner ad. If you’re looking for web hosting or thinking about changing providers, I urge you to give them a shot. They sure checked all the boxes for me and I couldn’t be happier with the service, the value, and especially their eco-stewardship.

It just makes sense.

— David R